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3 Sell-Out Shows for D3

by Clara Xu

Titled as "Watching TV", this segment is choreographed by Principal Choreographer, Kay Lee, and is also D3's virgin showcase of an all-guys dance. | Photo in courtesy of Ngee Ann Polytechnic Photography Club (NPPC) This segment revolves around competition, as it depicts the competition of life as reflected on the screen. | Photo in courtesy of Ngee Ann Polytechnic Photography Club (NPPC) "Stuck In Between" kickstarted D3's 2014 Dance Recital as it tells the story of how the ugly side of humans are revealed in the face of aggression and struggles in life. | Photo in courtesy of Ngee Ann Polytechnic Photography Club (NPPC)
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"Stuck In Between" kickstarted D3's 2014 Dance Recital as it tells the story of how the ugly side of humans are revealed in the face of aggression and struggles in life. | Photo in courtesy of Ngee Ann Polytechnic Photography Club (NPPC)

It was a big-bang dance recital for NP’s Dance Contemporary Club.

They did not need guns to sell out three shows. Their track record of excellent dance recitals in the past two years ­was enough to draw in the audience.

Perhaps the other compelling reason was that the show aimed to benefit the Ngee Ann Polytechnic’s Student Aid Fund. No matter, but the Dance Contemporary Club (D3) received a standing ovation for their show titled “Guns and Roses” held on 24 and 25 Oct, as part of Arts Fiesta 2014.

“We were not 100 per cent sure that we would be able to sell out all three shows, but we did!” said Loretta Merveile Lim, Dance Captain of D3, as the club raised the bar higher this year by staging three instead of two shows

The two-hour show held at the Music Box raised $17,550 for needy students. Tickets were priced at $15.

Artania Raharso, 19, the President of the five-year club and a Year 2 Film, Sound & Video student, said: “[The show] is actually more about life stories, how life can be full of ‘Roses’ which is happiness and ‘Guns’ which symbolises the hardships in life.”

Presented in 12 different segments, one following another, each dance tells a different meaning as emotions are evoked through the exaggeration of their dance steps.

For this production comprising of 12 dances and 92 dancers, D3 had a new guest choreographer, Ms Jacqueline Yap, 25, an expressive dancer who was involved in the production of In The Making (ITM) and the organisation of The Royal Dance-Off (TRDO). Ms Yap has experience in both classical ballet and contemporary dance.

In addition, D3’s principal choreographer, Ms Kay Lee, created an all-guys item titled “Watching TV” which was inspired by an unused sofa kept in the studio’s storeroom.

Kay started her dancing career at the age of 13, where she learnt from Mdm Low Mei Yoke, Artistic Director of local contemporary dance company Frontier Danceland from 1994 to 2004.

She said: “They gave me their titles of their favourite TV programmes like ‘How I Met Your Mother’, ‘Ghost Whisperer’, ‘Spongebob’. So I went to YouTube to extract some episodes so my item has these voiceovers [while] they dance to the narrations.”

The dance revolved around five men taking turns to watch their favourite television programme, before what was screened became parallel to what was happening in their lives. There were heart-felt dance moments that mingled with the comic that made the audience erupt in laughter.

Brendan Ong, who performed in “Watching TV” said: “In all honesty, there were no expectations at all. At first their reaction threw me off guard, laughing at something that never came across as comical to me. I never expected it to be so well received!”

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